How does the poem After Blenheim reflect upon the theme of man’s inhumanity to man?

How does the poem After Blenheim reflect upon the theme of man’s inhumanity to man?

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    The phrase “man’s inhumanity to man” was coined by the poet Robert Burns and it is reflected in the antiwar poem, “After Blenheim.” The skull discovered by Peterkin and Old Kasper’s confession that he had found several skulls while furrowing, reflects to the harsh cruelties of the war, even after the war has ended. Old Kaspar said that the skulls belonged to that of many brave soldiers who died fighting in a way. To him the death of the soldier is not remorseful but the fact that he died for a great victory is more commendable. He dismissed war and his horrors by saying how important it is for victory to be achieved. He thought war was easily fought and the lives lost in the battle were trivial. Peterkin questioned him what “good came” at the end of the war to which Old Kaspar responded by saying he doesn’t know but all he knew and all he cared was that it was a famous victory. He lived and survived under an illusion which was why till the very end he kept on saying that all that matters was the great victory, which was the mentality of the common folk during those times as they kept on glorifying war.

    Summary of After Blenheim Poem

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