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  1. The third ship drove towards the North, Over the sea, the darkening sea, But no breath of wind came forth, And the decks shone frostily. The poet observed the third ship sailing over the dark sea in a northerly direction. The decks glistened frostily since there was no breeze.

    The third ship drove towards the North, Over the sea, the darkening sea, But no breath of wind came forth, And the decks shone frostily. The poet observed the third ship sailing over the dark sea in a northerly direction. The decks glistened frostily since there was no breeze.

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  1. The North Ship, life tale about a man’s life who decides to immigrate to no man’s land. Released in every direction, this poem wins the life award for best philosophical access. Read More Poetry Despite life’s concern, we proclaim that we too must move on. Philip Larkin’s poem, The North Ship is aboRead more

    The North Ship, life tale about a man’s life who decides to immigrate to no man’s land. Released in every direction, this poem wins the life award for best philosophical access. Read More Poetry Despite life’s concern, we proclaim that we too must move on.

    Philip Larkin’s poem, The North Ship is about this journey of life. Life is a continuous journey and it is a kind of endless journey battling all the obstacles en route. Philip Larkin’s The North Ship makes a sharp focus on that eternal goal of ours towards the meeting of unknown and unseen.  Like that of the Tennyson’s Ulysses, the poem The North Ship highlights our point of desired goals – a meeting point of onward journey –a forward journey where perils to invest us. It is a kind of symbolic journey of aspiration that overawes all obstacles

    This poem states the journey of three ships at three different destinations. While the first two ship return safely, the third one goes in to calamity and meets hazardous ends

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  1. Assonance: Assonance is the repetition of vowel sounds in the same line. For example, the sound of /ee/ in “This creature of cleaving wing” and the sound of /ai/ in “And the Pride of Life that planned her, stilly couches she” and the sound of /a/ in “In stature, grace, and hue”. Alliteration: AlliteRead more

    1. Assonance: Assonance is the repetition of vowel sounds in the same line. For example, the sound of /ee/ in “This creature of cleaving wing” and the sound of /ai/ in “And the Pride of Life that planned her, stilly couches she” and the sound of /a/ in “In stature, grace, and hue”.
    2. Alliteration: Alliteration is the repetition of consonant sounds in the same line in quick succession. The poem is rich with plenty of alliterations throughout the poem. For example, the sound of /w/ in “Well: while was fashioning and the sound of /th/ in “Or sign that they were bent”.
    3. Consonance: Consonance is the repetition of consonant sounds in the same line. For example, the sound of /m/ in “Deep from human vanity” and the sound of /ng/ in “This creature of cleaving wing”.

    The convergence of twain Summary

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  1. The main ideas emphasized in this poem are pride, destruction, and wonder. The poem illustrates how human beings have a materialistic outlook and how nature is superior to man's arrogance. He begins by discussing the expensive items made to please the passengers, but these elaborate goods are now usRead more

    The main ideas emphasized in this poem are pride, destruction, and wonder. The poem illustrates how human beings have a materialistic outlook and how nature is superior to man’s arrogance. He begins by discussing the expensive items made to please the passengers, but these elaborate goods are now useless. Later, he shows how the ship will inevitably crash into the iceberg. No one could have predicted the eventual disaster because the trip seemed to be so relaxing. The poem’s tone and word choice imply that an “Immanent Will” of some sort created the iceberg specifically for that ship as if they were meant to be together.

    The convergence of twain Summary

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