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  1. Lucifer better to reign in hell than to serve in heaven

    Romantic tragedy refers to a genre of literature that focuses on the emotions of characters in stories with tragic endings. The genre arose in the 1700s, and its popularity lasted until the early 1800s.

    Romantic tragedy refers to a genre of literature that focuses on the emotions of characters in stories with tragic endings. The genre arose in the 1700s, and its popularity lasted until the early 1800s.

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  1. Lucifer better to reign in hell than to serve in heaven
    This answer was edited.

    Romantic poetry is a style of poetry which emerged in England and Europe in the early 19th century. It is characterized by a belief in the importance of the individual and the expression of intense emotion in a range of poetic forms and registers. Romantic poets are often associated with nature andRead more

    Romantic poetry is a style of poetry which emerged in England and Europe in the early 19th century. It is characterized by a belief in the importance of the individual and the expression of intense emotion in a range of poetic forms and registers.

    Romantic poets are often associated with nature and instead of writing about the beauty of everything around them, they have a tendency to focus on the darker elements of nature. They also have a tendency to focus on the darker elements of human life.

    Detailed Notes on Romantic Poetry

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  1. Lucifer better to reign in hell than to serve in heaven

    The rules of Courtly love were loosely established by the code of the court of Love.  It was a noble institution where young knights would be instructed in the ways of love. In particular, they would observe a form of love based on the relationship between a knight and his lady. In the Middle Ages,Read more

    The rules of Courtly love were loosely established by the code of the court of Love.  It was a noble institution where young knights would be instructed in the ways of love. In particular, they would observe a form of love based on the relationship between a knight and his lady. In the Middle Ages, Courtly love was a popular subject of art and literature.

    Courtly love embodied a certain set of ideals that were based on the idea of a knight’s loyalty to a lady of a high ranking.

    A knight would defend his lady’s honor at all costs and would often die for her. The relationship between a knight and his lady had a distinct set of rules. A knight would always be respectful to his lady and would never address her by her name, but instead refer to her as “my lady” and to himself as “your servant”.

    The knight was expected to be a servant to his lady, and to protect her from any harm. He would never be rude to her, and would always remain faithful. The love was not supposed to be sexual. This kind of love is called “courtly love” because it was a code of conduct practised by the aristocracy in medieval Europe. In exchange for the lady promising to be faithful, her lover would do things for her.

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  1. Lucifer better to reign in hell than to serve in heaven

    Courtly love (or fin'amor ) is a medieval European concept regarding chivalric love and literary idea that came into prominence in the 12th century, developed in the context of the Occitan troubadour tradition in southern France, and was introduced to the court of King Henry II of England by EleanorRead more

    Courtly love (or fin’amor ) is a medieval European concept regarding chivalric love and literary idea that came into prominence in the 12th century, developed in the context of the Occitan troubadour tradition in southern France, and was introduced to the court of King Henry II of England by Eleanor of Aquitaine.

    A major aspect of courtly love was the knight’s devotion to his lady; the knight was expected to love and respect his lady even after she was married to another man, or if she never married. This kind of love was often tempestuous, with the focus on the lady’s feelings, and was usually unconsummated.

    The motifs of courtly love were first made popular by the troubadours of Provence and Northern France. The troubadours were poets and musicians, who used their talents to seduce noblewomen and other patrons. They were often on tour, and would therefore court their patrons, who would give them gifts and money to continue their art. Courtly Love was also the inspiration for the knightly love in medieval romance, which was about noble knights who chose to die for their loves.

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    Courtly love was a medieval European literary conception of love that emphasized nobility and chivalry. It was prevalent in Western Europe from about the 11th to the 15th century. In the tradition of courtly love, a knight would be devoted to a high-ranking lady, sometimes a wife or a mistress, butRead more

    Courtly love was a medieval European literary conception of love that emphasized nobility and chivalry. It was prevalent in Western Europe from about the 11th to the 15th century.

    In the tradition of courtly love, a knight would be devoted to a high-ranking lady, sometimes a wife or a mistress, but always a woman of a higher social status. He would show his devotion by performing great deeds, or by writing love poetry or songs, and by giving gifts to the woman.

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  1. It was a time of great change in England. The country was rich, and the English language was becoming standardized. This created a wealth of opportunity for the Elizabethan poets. Their poetry was mostly about love, and many of it was written in the Sonnet style. The poets were also interested in thRead more

    It was a time of great change in England. The country was rich, and the English language was becoming standardized. This created a wealth of opportunity for the Elizabethan poets. Their poetry was mostly about love, and many of it was written in the Sonnet style.

    The poets were also interested in the changes in the times, as England was becoming a strong and independent nation. As a result, several of the poets were involved in politics and wrote about political themes. These poems often used very plain and simple language and were often written in various kinds of verse, such as heroic couplets and iambic pentameter.

    Detailed Article on Characteristics of Elizabethan Poetry

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  1. Sonnets, epics and odes were the three forms of English poetry that flourished during the Elizabethan Age of English literature. Detailed Article on Characteristics of Elizabethan Poetry

    Sonnets, epics and odes were the three forms of English poetry that flourished during the Elizabethan Age of English literature.

    Detailed Article on Characteristics of Elizabethan Poetry

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  1. The chief forms of Elizabethan poetry were the sonnet, the epigram, and the elegy. The sonnet consists of fourteen lines, and although its form suggests that it is a love poem, it frequently discusses other topics. The epigram is a short poem often with an admonitory or moral theme. The elegy is a sRead more

    The chief forms of Elizabethan poetry were the sonnet, the epigram, and the elegy.

    1. The sonnet consists of fourteen lines, and although its form suggests that it is a love poem, it frequently discusses other topics.
    2. The epigram is a short poem often with an admonitory or moral theme.
    3. The elegy is a serious poem that forms a memorial to the dead.

    Detailed Article on Characteristics of Elizabethan Poetry

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  1. Lucifer better to reign in hell than to serve in heaven

    The different 20th century literary genres are: Adventure Analogy Autobiography Biography Comedy Criticism Decadence Dialogue Drama Enigma Essay Fantasy Fairy tale Fiction Folktale History Humor Juvenile Letter Lyric Metaphor Myth Narrative Nature writing Novel Parody Poetry Politics Satire ScienceRead more

    The different 20th century literary genres are:

    • Adventure
    • Analogy
    • Autobiography
    • Biography
    • Comedy
    • Criticism
    • Decadence
    • Dialogue
    • Drama
    • Enigma
    • Essay
    • Fantasy
    • Fairy tale
    • Fiction
    • Folktale
    • History
    • Humor
    • Juvenile
    • Letter
    • Lyric
    • Metaphor
    • Myth
    • Narrative
    • Nature writing
    • Novel
    • Parody
    • Poetry
    • Politics
    • Satire
    • Science fiction
    • Short story
    • Skit
    • Tragedy
    • Travelogue
    • Verse
    • Western
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