English Notes Latest Questions

  1. Yes, bread making is still popular in Goa. This is very clear from the narrator's statement that the eaters have gone away leaving the makers behind. There are mixers, moulders and the ones who bake the loaves.

    Yes, bread making is still popular in Goa. This is very clear from the narrator’s statement that the eaters have gone away leaving the makers behind. There are mixers, moulders and the ones who bake the loaves.

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  1. Walt Whitman’s ‘Animals’ uses a number of literary devices. The first line starts with a paradox. Following that, the poet employs personification to portray animals with human attributes. The usage of a repetition at the start of consecutive lines is done for emphasis. The word “sick” has been usedRead more

    Walt Whitman’s ‘Animals’ uses a number of literary devices. The first line starts with a paradox. Following that, the poet employs personification to portray animals with human attributes. The usage of a repetition at the start of consecutive lines is done for emphasis. The word “sick” has been used as a metaphor.

    Animals Summary

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  1. Walt Whitman, the poet, compares the feeling of being with animals and humans and admits that he feels more at ease and at home with animals than with his fellow humans. Humans have gone insane in their pursuit of material goods. They’re a jumble of complexities. They have nightmares and mourn for tRead more

    Walt Whitman, the poet, compares the feeling of being with animals and humans and admits that he feels more at ease and at home with animals than with his fellow humans. Humans have gone insane in their pursuit of material goods. They’re a jumble of complexities. They have nightmares and mourn for their sins because their conscience is impure. Animals, on the other hand, are satisfied, tranquil, and self-contained. They aren’t motivated by anything other than their meals. They don’t need to worship God since they never feel guilty or sinful. In the distant past, our ancestors exchanged those signs of love and understanding. Unfortunately, mankind has permanently lost those values and signs of love and compassion.

    Animals poem summary

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  1. “Where The Mind Is Without Fear” is a thought-provoking poem by Nobel Laureate Rabindranath Tagore, an Indian writer. Tagore is a poet, dramatist and often refers to as ‘the Bard of Bengal’. It is one the best poems in the anthology called “Gitanjali” which was published in 1912 and won the prestigiRead more

    “Where The Mind Is Without Fear” is a thought-provoking poem by Nobel Laureate Rabindranath Tagore, an Indian writer. Tagore is a poet, dramatist and often refers to as ‘the Bard of Bengal’.

    It is one the best poems in the anthology called “Gitanjali” which was published in 1912 and won the prestigious Nobel Prize for Literature in 1913.

    When Tagore composed this poem his mind was confined by the chains of slavery-like any other common citizens of India because India was under the clutch of the British Rule where freedom was like day-dreaming.

    This poem is written in the form of prayer to God, the true bearer of freedom. He urges God throughout the poem with his mysterious concept of freedom from the struggle for awakening to his countrymen.

    Where the mind is without fear summary

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  1. Best Answer
    Lucifer better to reign in hell than to serve in heaven

    Agamemnon is the king of Mycenae, the then most powerful city in ancient Greece. He successfully led his people to glory, emerging victorious over the Greeks. After his death, his daughter, Iphigenia, sacrificed herself so her father could return home to Mycenae. Agamemnon - (1) The father of AchillRead more

    Agamemnon is the king of Mycenae, the then most powerful city in ancient Greece. He successfully led his people to glory, emerging victorious over the Greeks. After his death, his daughter, Iphigenia, sacrificed herself so her father could return home to Mycenae.

    Agamemnon –

    (1) The father of Achilles (2) The king of Mycenae (3) A priest in Homer’s Iliad (4) A king of Mycenae (5) An ancient king of Mycenae (6) A famous king of Mycenae (7) A king of Mycenae (8) A king of Mycenae (9) A famous king of Mycenae

    The Browning Version Summary

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