1. It's a comedy in which a wealthy landowner named Hardcastle desires his daughter, Kate Hardcastle, to marry the well-educated Charles Marlow. So, the landowner father together with young Charles Marlow's father arrange and set up Charles Marlow to visit Hardcastle's house and court Kate.

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  2. The novel is set against the backdrop which leads up to the French Revolution and the infamous Reign of Terror. It's a story about a French doctor, Manette, who is serving 18-year imprisonment in Paris' Fort, Bastille. After his release, his life in London with his daughter, Lucie, whom he had neverRead more

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  3. The theme of power is the central force driving the play from beginning to the end. Hunger for power is what drives Claudius to murder King Hamlet and thus starting a series of events, leading to a loop of corruption in relationship, morality, betrayal, revenge and madness.

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  4. Because there is a recurrent and uncompromising need to court the woman inside the privacy of a room and consummate sexually, is not found in most important poets before Donne. In the poem, the precinct of the lover's room becomes into a parallel world, a better one, by the fact of its occupancy byRead more

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  5. The word "Metaphysical" applies in an obvious sense to Donne's poetry insofar as that he regularly speaks of the world of souls and spirits- the world beyond the physical- meta-physical.

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  6. Lady Macbeth's tragedy lies in her being over-ambitious. Just as the tale of Icarus and Dedalus, Icarus flew too close to the sun despite several warning from his father, resulting in his wax wings getting melt, leading him to downfall. Similarly, Lady Macbeth is also overly ambitious being a loyalRead more

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  7. The poem is written from the love chamber of the two lovers. The sun's rays enter through the windows and mark the end of the night. The bed is the centre around which the sun revolves. Sun, as the source of vigour and vitality, is invited to shine upon the lovers. The paradigm of the voyeuristic thRead more

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  8. John Donne has cleverly and extensively used tools of figures of speech in this poem, mainly by use of simile, metaphor, pun, personification, hyperbole etc. The title of the poem is itself a metaphor for  "waking up to a new life" Similarly, use of Hyperbole, metaphor, simile, and pun is used in thRead more

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  9. The Good Morrow by John Donne is a love poem because it explicitly describes itself as a love poem. The lines of the poems are indicative of love between two lovers and how their souls have awakened only after they are united. The poet vindicates how his entire life before falling in love seems nowRead more

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  10. This answer was edited.

    The poem, The Good-Morrow is written from the point of view of an awaking lover and describes the lover's thoughts as he wakes next to his partner. The lover's musings move from discussing sensual love to spiritual love coupled with biblical references as he realises that, with spiritual love, the cRead more

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