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  1. Humour: In Charles Lamb's essay "Dream Children: A Reverie," he humorously recounts a dream in which he has two children, a boy and a girl, who he imagines are his own. He playfully muses about how the children would look, sound, and act, and how they would bring joy to his life. He imagines how theRead more

    Humour: In Charles Lamb’s essay “Dream Children: A Reverie,” he humorously recounts a dream in which he has two children, a boy and a girl, who he imagines are his own. He playfully muses about how the children would look, sound, and act, and how they would bring joy to his life. He imagines how they would play together and how he would watch them with a “pleasure ever new.”

    Pathos: Lamb also expresses a deep sense of regret and sadness throughout the essay. He realizes that, as a bachelor, he will never have children of his own, and this regret is palpable in his dream. He alludes to this regret when describing how he imagined the children “growing up to be a comfort to me in my age.” The sense of sadness is further amplified when he recounts how he would have to wake up from the dream and realize that the children were not real.

    Summary of Dream Children

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  1. Charles Lamb entitled the essay “Dream Children” because he never married and naturally never became the father of any children. The children he speaks of in the essay were actually the creations of his imagination or fancy.

    Charles Lamb entitled the essay “Dream Children” because he never married and naturally never became the father of any children. The children he speaks of in the essay were actually the creations of his imagination or fancy.

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  1. As a result of Lamb's lack of marriage and consequent lack of children, the essay is referred to as a "reverie." He developed a fictional picture of a happy conjugal life in the essay, which, when he returns to reality, eventually disintegrates into nothingness and becomes meaningless. To begin withRead more

    As a result of Lamb’s lack of marriage and consequent lack of children, the essay is referred to as a “reverie.” He developed a fictional picture of a happy conjugal life in the essay, which, when he returns to reality, eventually disintegrates into nothingness and becomes meaningless.

    To begin with, what exactly is a reverie in Lamb’s dream children? A reverie is a state of being completely absorbed in one’s thoughts. Generally speaking, this is associated with pleasant daydreaming, but it can also be associated with melancholy. At the heart of this essay are sentiments of fond recollection, longing, and ultimately, sadness. His great-grandmother Field and his uncle John are among the relatives he remembers fondly from his childhood.

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  1. Best Answer
    Lucifer better to reign in hell than to serve in heaven

    The phrase “Light Brigade” is used in the poem “The Charge of the Light Brigade” for the British Army who marched to Russia to fight against their forces. The word Brigade means sub-division of the army. Here in the poem, the British Army consisted of 600 soldiers which the poet mentions repeatedlyRead more

    The phrase “Light Brigade” is used in the poem “The Charge of the Light Brigade” for the British Army who marched to Russia to fight against their forces. The word Brigade means sub-division of the army.

    Here in the poem, the British Army consisted of 600 soldiers which the poet mentions repeatedly through out the verses. The word Light has been used for the troops because they were without heavy weapons like cannons and guns.

    The Brigade had only swords which is a Light weapon as compared to the weapons which the Russian Army had.

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