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    Despite not being a poem per se, this extract has a myriad of literary devices, some of which are as follows: Syncope: The omission of the letter ‘e’ can be seen in the word ‘answer’d’ to maintain the rhythm. Repetition: Brutus has been called an ‘honourable’ man repeatedly for added emphasis and wiRead more

    Despite not being a poem per se, this extract has a myriad of literary devices, some of which are as follows:

    1. Syncope: The omission of the letter ‘e’ can be seen in the word ‘answer’d’ to maintain the rhythm.
    2. Repetition: Brutus has been called an ‘honourable’ man repeatedly for added emphasis and with no less sarcasm by Antony.
    3. Alliteration: A couple of examples would be ‘sterner stuff’ and ‘brutish beasts’.

    Antony’s Speech Summary

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  1. This excerpt is not a poem per se, but is a speech. The stanzas here are thus merely for convenience. Nevertheless, the lines of Antony’s monologue follow Shakespeare’s famous blank verse consisting of unrhymed iambic pentameter.   Antony's Speech Summary

    This excerpt is not a poem per se, but is a speech. The stanzas here are thus merely for convenience. Nevertheless, the lines of Antony’s monologue follow Shakespeare’s famous blank verse consisting of unrhymed iambic pentameter.

     

    Antony’s Speech Summary

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  1. The central idea of this excerpt can be taken to be the deep bond of friendship Antony shared with Caesar. He moves the minds of the people with his monologue, thus avenging the death of his dear friend skillfully.   Antony's Speech Summary

    The central idea of this excerpt can be taken to be the deep bond of friendship Antony shared with Caesar. He moves the minds of the people with his monologue, thus avenging the death of his dear friend skillfully.

     

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  1. This poem is written in free verse with lines of varying lengths. It does not follow a rhyme scheme.   Freedom Summary

    This poem is written in free verse with lines of varying lengths. It does not follow a rhyme scheme.

     

    Freedom Summary

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    This poem has a myriad of poetic devices, some of which are as follows: Apostrophe: This can be seen when the persona directly addresses their motherland in the line ‘I claim for you my motherland!’. Alliteration: A couple of examples would be ‘Freedom from fear is the freedom’ and ‘Breaking your baRead more

    This poem has a myriad of poetic devices, some of which are as follows:

    1. Apostrophe: This can be seen when the persona directly addresses their motherland in the line ‘I claim for you my motherland!’.
    2. Alliteration: A couple of examples would be ‘Freedom from fear is the freedom’ and ‘Breaking your back, blinding your eyes to the beckoning call of the future. The ‘f’ and ‘b’ sounds are stressed here, respectively.
    3. Metaphor: In the lines ‘Whole sails are… winds/ And the helm… death’, destiny is called a ship.

    Freedom Summary

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  1. The central idea of the poem is the patriotism shown by the persona in the face of their motherland. Every stanza, every line of the poem reverberates with the deep yearning the persona feels for their nation to attain freedom, thus shedding light on their unwavering love and faith in their country.Read more

    The central idea of the poem is the patriotism shown by the persona in the face of their motherland. Every stanza, every line of the poem reverberates with the deep yearning the persona feels for their nation to attain freedom, thus shedding light on their unwavering love and faith in their country.

     

    Freedom Summary

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    Simile: In the line ‘There came a wave-like a great hand’, a tsunami is compared to a huge hand with the usage of the word ‘like’, making it a simile. Metaphor: ‘A huge wall of white horses galloping ashore’ and ‘a hungry hound’ are both metaphors that denote the tsunami. Alliteration: A couple of eRead more

    1. Simile: In the line ‘There came a wave-like a great hand’, a tsunami is compared to a huge hand with the usage of the word ‘like’, making it a simile.
    2. Metaphor: ‘A huge wall of white horses galloping ashore’ and ‘a hungry hound’ are both metaphors that denote the tsunami.
    3. Alliteration: A couple of examples would be ‘fingers of foam’ and ‘hungry hound’.

    Grabbing everything on the land Summary

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  1. This short lyric poem is divided into five rhyming stanzas, the first three of them being quatrains with the last two consisting of six lines each. The rhyme scheme is a simple aabb for the quatrains and aabbcc for the remaining two stanzas. Grabbing Everything on the Land Summary

    This short lyric poem is divided into five rhyming stanzas, the first three of them being quatrains with the last two consisting of six lines each. The rhyme scheme is a simple aabb for the quatrains and aabbcc for the remaining two stanzas.

    Grabbing Everything on the Land Summary

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  1. The central idea of this poem is tsunami, a catastrophic natural calamity. Each stanza of this poem details on its savagery, on how it preys on humans without remorse and how it is undefeatable. People perishing on account of this and its inevitability is focused upon thus.  Grabbing Everything on tRead more

    The central idea of this poem is tsunami, a catastrophic natural calamity. Each stanza of this poem details on its savagery, on how it preys on humans without remorse and how it is undefeatable. People perishing on account of this and its inevitability is focused upon thus.

     Grabbing Everything on the Land Summary

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    Simile:In the line ‘I feel like I have just been shot’, the persona compares him feeling terrible to feeling as if they have been shot. The usage of like makes this a simile thus. Apostrophe: The persona addressed this poem to their teacher. This can be seen with the usage of the word ‘you’ throughoRead more

    1. Simile:In the line ‘I feel like I have just been shot’, the persona compares him feeling terrible to feeling as if they have been shot. The usage of like makes this a simile thus.
    2. Apostrophe: The persona addressed this poem to their teacher. This can be seen with the usage of the word ‘you’ throughout the poem.
    3. Enjambment: This poem has sentences running over to the subsequent line. A couple of examples would be ‘As each day grew longer/Our trust became stronger and ‘Even though sometimes you don’t have time/You at least ask me if I am fine.

    Not Just a Teacher, But a Friend Summary

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