English Notes Latest Questions

  1. Indirect Speech: John said that he liked sweets. Explanation: When the reporting verb is in the past (said) and the direct speech is in the present indefinite tense (simple present tense), then the indirect (reported) speech will change into the past indefinite tense. Present Indefinite Tense > PRead more

    Indirect Speech: John said that he liked sweets.

    Explanation: When the reporting verb is in the past (said) and the direct speech is in the present indefinite tense (simple present tense), then the indirect (reported) speech will change into the past indefinite tense.

    Present Indefinite Tense > Past Indefinite Tense.

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  1. Indirect Speech: Mr. John told me that I should exercise regularly. Explanation: The modals – would, should, might, could, used to, etc don’t change. Learn Narration

    Indirect Speech: Mr. John told me that I should exercise regularly.

    Explanation: The modals – would, should, might, could, used to, etc don’t change.

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  1. Indirect Speech: John told his brother that he couldn't help him then. Explanation: If the reporting verb is in the past tense, then the modals like can changes to could, will/shall change to would, have to changes to had to etc. Learn Narration  

    Indirect Speech: John told his brother that he couldn’t help him then.

    Explanation: If the reporting verb is in the past tense, then the modals like can changes to could, will/shall change to would, have to changes to had to etc.

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  1. Indirect Speech: I requested John to pass me the salt. Explanation: While reporting imperative sentences we use reporting verbs like ask, request, beg, order, advise, wish etc to match the mood of the sentence. Learn Narration

    Indirect Speech: I requested John to pass me the salt.

    Explanation: While reporting imperative sentences we use reporting verbs like ask, request, beg, order, advise, wish etc to match the mood of the sentence.

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  1. Indirect Speech: John asked Ralph whether he was going to buy a new shirt to that day. Explanation: When the reporting verb is in the past (said) and the direct speech is in the present continuous tense, then the indirect (reported) speech will change into the past continuous tense. Present ContinuoRead more

    Indirect Speech: John asked Ralph whether he was going to buy a new shirt to that day.

    Explanation: When the reporting verb is in the past (said) and the direct speech is in the present continuous tense, then the indirect (reported) speech will change into the past continuous tense.

    Present Continuous Tense > Past Continuous Tense.

    And if the sentence is interrogative, we use the reporting verbs – asked, enquired, etc.

    Note: While answering to “yes or no questions”, we use if or whether.

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  1. Indirect Speech: John told his manager that he couldn't finish all of the work by himself. Explanation: If the reporting verb is in the past tense, then the modals like can changes to could, will/shall change to would, have to changes to had to etc. Learn Narration

    Indirect Speech: John told his manager that he couldn’t finish all of the work by himself.

    Explanation: If the reporting verb is in the past tense, then the modals like can changes to could, will/shall change to would, have to changes to had to etc.

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  1. Indirect Speech: John told me that I was his friend. Explanation: When the reporting verb is in the past (said) and the direct speech is in the present indefinite tense (simple present tense), then the indirect (reported) speech will change into the past indefinite tense. Present Indefinite TenseRead more

    Indirect Speech: John told me that I was his friend.

    Explanation: When the reporting verb is in the past (said) and the direct speech is in the present indefinite tense (simple present tense), then the indirect (reported) speech will change into the past indefinite tense.

    Present Indefinite Tense > Past Indefinite Tense.

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  1. Indirect Speech: John asked me when I would leave. Explanation: If the reporting verb is in the past tense, then the modals like will/shall change to would. And if the sentence is interrogative, we use the reporting verbs - asked, enquired, etc. Learn Narration 

    Indirect Speech: John asked me when I would leave.

    Explanation: If the reporting verb is in the past tense, then the modals like will/shall change to would.

    And if the sentence is interrogative, we use the reporting verbs – asked, enquired, etc.

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  1. Indirect Speech: John asked me whether I would buy a camera. Explanation: If the reporting verb is in the past tense, then the modals like will/shall change to would. And if the sentence is interrogative, we use the reporting verbs - asked, enquired, etc Note: While answering to "yes or no questionsRead more

    Indirect Speech: John asked me whether I would buy a camera.

    Explanation: If the reporting verb is in the past tense, then the modals like will/shall change to would.

    And if the sentence is interrogative, we use the reporting verbs – asked, enquired, etc

    Note: While answering to “yes or no questions”, we use if or whether.

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  1. Indirect Speech: John told me that when I went there, it had been raining. Explanation: When the reporting verb is in the past (said) and the direct speech is in the present indefinite tense (simple present tense), then the indirect (reported) speech will change into the past indefinite tense. PreseRead more

    Indirect Speech: John told me that when I went there, it had been raining.

    Explanation: When the reporting verb is in the past (said) and the direct speech is in the present indefinite tense (simple present tense), then the indirect (reported) speech will change into the past indefinite tense.

    Present Indefinite Tense > Past Indefinite Tense.

    And when the reporting verb is in the past (said) and the direct speech is in the past continuous tense, then the indirect (reported) speech will change into the past perfect continuous tense.

    Past Continuous Tense > Past Perfect Continuous Tense.

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