English Notes Latest Questions

  1. As your wish means that you can do anything you want. Here are some examples: I will read the book as your wish. I will do the job as your wish. I will finish it as your wish. I will go there as your wish. I will help you as your wish. I will do it as your wish. I will send email as your wish. I wilRead more

    As your wish means that you can do anything you want. Here are some examples:

    • I will read the book as your wish.
    • I will do the job as your wish.
    • I will finish it as your wish.
    • I will go there as your wish.
    • I will help you as your wish.
    • I will do it as your wish.
    • I will send email as your wish.
    • I will get ready as your wish.
    • I will come as your wish.
    • I will get up as your wish.
    • I will help you as your wish.
    • I will buy it as your wish.
    • I will do it as your wish.
    • I will cook it as your wish.
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  1. Best Answer
    Lucifer better to reign in hell than to serve in heaven

    A hungry man is an angry man refers to the state of anger people feel when hungry. This phrase is often used in the context of starving people who had no other choice but to beg for food or use the way of violence.

    A hungry man is an angry man refers to the state of anger people feel when hungry. This phrase is often used in the context of starving people who had no other choice but to beg for food or use the way of violence.

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  1. Best Answer
    Lucifer better to reign in hell than to serve in heaven

    It is a colloquialism for "that is exactly what I said." For example, suppose you were to say, "I'll meet you at the bar at 8:00." If someone else says, "That's what she said," then they are saying that it is exactly what you said. It is an American colloquial joke phrase which is popular on the IntRead more

    It is a colloquialism for “that is exactly what I said.” For example, suppose you were to say, “I’ll meet you at the bar at 8:00.” If someone else says, “That’s what she said,” then they are saying that it is exactly what you said.

    It is an American colloquial joke phrase which is popular on the Internet. It is a phrase used to make a play on words that insinuates a risqué comment on a situation when an explicit comment cannot be made.

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  1. Lucifer better to reign in hell than to serve in heaven

    The phrase "one down, one more to go" is used to describe when one person or team completes a specific task while there is another team member who still has work to do.

    The phrase “one down, one more to go” is used to describe when one person or team completes a specific task while there is another team member who still has work to do.

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  1. Lucifer better to reign in hell than to serve in heaven

    "Can I get a hoya" is an incorrect spelling of "Can I have a vowel?" It is a slang used when you want to ask someone to repeat the last word they have said.

    “Can I get a hoya” is an incorrect spelling of “Can I have a vowel?” It is a slang used when you want to ask someone to repeat the last word they have said.

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  1. Lucifer better to reign in hell than to serve in heaven

    Don't tread on me. It's a phrase taken from the American Revolution but has been used in reference to the American flag since the early 20th century. The original meaning of the phrase is that the person standing on the Constitution, i.e. the United States, has the right to protect it and its peopleRead more

    Don’t tread on me. It’s a phrase taken from the American Revolution but has been used in reference to the American flag since the early 20th century. The original meaning of the phrase is that the person standing on the Constitution, i.e. the United States, has the right to protect it and its people from unwarranted governmental intrusion.

    It was originally used by the Sons of Liberty who were protesting the British government’s actions during the American Revolution. They would often hold up a sign or carry a flag which said “Don’t tread on me.” The current meaning is more political. The phrase was first used in reference to the Vietnam War by the American Legion when they began their anti-war campaign. In 1970, President Nixon said the following about the phrase: “I think ‘Don’t Tread on Me’ means don’t go too far.

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