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  1. This poem has a myriad of poetic devices, some of which are as follows: Apostrophe: The persona’s ‘foe’ or ‘he’, is constantly mentioned in the poem even though he was not present, making it an apostrophe.  Alliteration: A couple of examples would be ‘Had he’ and ‘face to face’.  Enjambment: The linRead more

    This poem has a myriad of poetic devices, some of which are as follows:

    1. Apostrophe: The persona’s ‘foe’ or ‘he’, is constantly mentioned in the poem even though he was not present, making it an apostrophe. 
    2. Alliteration: A couple of examples would be ‘Had he’ and ‘face to face’. 
    3. Enjambment: The lines of this poem run over to the next. One example where this is more pronounced would be ‘That’s clear enough; although/”He thought he’d ‘list, perhaps’ where the persona’s dilemma is highlighted. 

     

    The Man He Killed Summary

     

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  1. The central idea of the poem is friendship. The persona almost yearns for his foe to have been a friend, someone whom he could have had an intimate connection with and share drinks and a laugh.    The Man He Killed Summary

    The central idea of the poem is friendship. The persona almost yearns for his foe to have been a friend, someone whom he could have had an intimate connection with and share drinks and a laugh. 

     

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  1. This poem is divided into 5 stanzas consisting of 4 lines each. It follows the rhyme scheme ‘abab’ in each stanza.    The Man He Killed Summary

    This poem is divided into 5 stanzas consisting of 4 lines each. It follows the rhyme scheme ‘abab’ in each stanza. 

     

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  1. The theme of this poem is war. Each stanza delves into the consequences of war, and how pointless it is.    The Man He Killed Summary

    The theme of this poem is war. Each stanza delves into the consequences of war, and how pointless it is. 

     

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  1. Assonance: Assonance is the repetition of vowel sounds in the same line. For example, the sound of /ee/ in “This creature of cleaving wing” and the sound of /ai/ in “And the Pride of Life that planned her, stilly couches she” and the sound of /a/ in “In stature, grace, and hue”. Alliteration: AlliteRead more

    1. Assonance: Assonance is the repetition of vowel sounds in the same line. For example, the sound of /ee/ in “This creature of cleaving wing” and the sound of /ai/ in “And the Pride of Life that planned her, stilly couches she” and the sound of /a/ in “In stature, grace, and hue”.
    2. Alliteration: Alliteration is the repetition of consonant sounds in the same line in quick succession. The poem is rich with plenty of alliterations throughout the poem. For example, the sound of /w/ in “Well: while was fashioning and the sound of /th/ in “Or sign that they were bent”.
    3. Consonance: Consonance is the repetition of consonant sounds in the same line. For example, the sound of /m/ in “Deep from human vanity” and the sound of /ng/ in “This creature of cleaving wing”.

    The convergence of twain Summary

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  1. The main ideas emphasized in this poem are pride, destruction, and wonder. The poem illustrates how human beings have a materialistic outlook and how nature is superior to man's arrogance. He begins by discussing the expensive items made to please the passengers, but these elaborate goods are now usRead more

    The main ideas emphasized in this poem are pride, destruction, and wonder. The poem illustrates how human beings have a materialistic outlook and how nature is superior to man’s arrogance. He begins by discussing the expensive items made to please the passengers, but these elaborate goods are now useless. Later, he shows how the ship will inevitably crash into the iceberg. No one could have predicted the eventual disaster because the trip seemed to be so relaxing. The poem’s tone and word choice imply that an “Immanent Will” of some sort created the iceberg specifically for that ship as if they were meant to be together.

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  1. The speaker likens human arrogance and conceit to the mighty water. He claims that the sea is a peaceful environment. When someone visits there, their pride and arrogance vanish before the serene water.   The convergence of Twain Summary

    The speaker likens human arrogance and conceit to the mighty water. He claims that the sea is a peaceful environment. When someone visits there, their pride and arrogance vanish before the serene water.

     

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