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    In the poem, the poet sets up a gloomy and dejected ambience at the beginning. He bemoans the dying century and that is reflected through his description of the bleak winter. Amidst all this, he suddenly hears the voice of a bird. It is an “aged thrush, frail, gaunt and small.” That little bird is sRead more

    In the poem, the poet sets up a gloomy and dejected ambience at the beginning. He bemoans the dying century and that is reflected through his description of the bleak winter. Amidst all this, he suddenly hears the voice of a bird. It is an “aged thrush, frail, gaunt and small.” That little bird is singing a “full-hearted evensong of joy illimited.” The poet is surprised to see a small bird singing amidst all this desolation. The bird seems to be aware of some blessed hope which the poet is yet to discover. The bird’s song depicts the fact that Hope can be found even in the most desolate times. One should have an optimistic approach towards life. If a bird can sing its heart out, the poet believes everyone to be capable of finding hope and joy.

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    It is a transitional poem as it bridges the 19th and the 20th centuries together. The poem marks the end of a year, the end of a century and looking ahead for the next century with both skepticism and hope. The poem connects both centuries together by bringing hope amidst all despair. It transitionsRead more

    It is a transitional poem as it bridges the 19th and the 20th centuries together. The poem marks the end of a year, the end of a century and looking ahead for the next century with both skepticism and hope. The poem connects both centuries together by bringing hope amidst all despair. It transitions from one century to another just like it changes gril despair to hope.

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    The word “dregs” means the last of something. So over here “Winter’s dregs” means, the desolate end of winter, like a bleak “weakening eye of the day.” Read summary of The Darkling Thrush

    The word “dregs” means the last of something. So over here “Winter’s dregs” means, the desolate end of winter, like a bleak “weakening eye of the day.”

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    This line in this poem means that the the process of germination is dead. The speaker feels that because of extreme cold, the rhythm of conception and truth has slowed down remarkably. Read summary of The Darkling Thrush

    This line in this poem means that the the process of germination is dead. The speaker feels that because of extreme cold, the rhythm of conception and truth has slowed down remarkably.

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    “The Darkling Thrush” is, to some extent, very much like Victorian poetry in terms of style, content and purpose. This poem follows the pattern of a short lyric poem as often seen in Victorian poetry. The poem is also like an internal monologue, voicing the thoughts and emotions which the speaker isRead more

    “The Darkling Thrush” is, to some extent, very much like Victorian poetry in terms of style, content and purpose. This poem follows the pattern of a short lyric poem as often seen in Victorian poetry. The poem is also like an internal monologue, voicing the thoughts and emotions which the speaker is undergoing at that moment. Written in an almost elegy style as if bidding farewell to the dying century is upsetting for the speaker.

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  1. The poet has given up all hope when, at the beginning of the poem, he laments the dying century. He is saddened at the “ancient pulse of germ and birth was shrunken hard and dry.” He believes with the dying century all things good and beneficial are coming to an end. However when he hears the song oRead more

    The poet has given up all hope when, at the beginning of the poem, he laments the dying century. He is saddened at the “ancient pulse of germ and birth was shrunken hard and dry.” He believes with the dying century all things good and beneficial are coming to an end. However when he hears the song of an aged thrush, singing a “full-hearted evensong” amidst all this desolation, the poet realizes that the thrush is aware of some blessed hope which he is yet to find. This serves as a waking call to the poet who needs to look beyond his pessimism in life to find that single ray of hope. The poet learns the message that hope can be found even in the most desolate times.

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