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  1. Lucifer better to reign in hell than to serve in heaven

    Still I Rise simply mean that the narrator’s spirit is indomitable against every misdeed directed against her hence it says that ‘Still I Rise.’

    Still I Rise simply mean that the narrator’s spirit is indomitable against every misdeed directed against her hence it says that ‘Still I Rise.’

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  1. Lucifer better to reign in hell than to serve in heaven

    Still I Rise is a poem about the poet’s own personal life’s hardships in the context of Black Americans who suffered the same and how they never gave up and still keep rising over injustices.

    Still I Rise is a poem about the poet’s own personal life’s hardships in the context of Black Americans who suffered the same and how they never gave up and still keep rising over injustices.

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  1. Lucifer better to reign in hell than to serve in heaven

    The poem reads like an Afro-American memoir. The tone is a mix of the slave narrative and the church sermon. It reads like a popular song of triumph.

    The poem reads like an Afro-American memoir. The tone is a mix of the slave narrative and the church sermon. It reads like a popular song of triumph.

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  1. Lucifer better to reign in hell than to serve in heaven

    The rhyme scheme of the poem is not consistent and it alternates. First three stanzas’ scheme is ABCB. Then it changes to ABCC in third stanza and the 4th, 5th, 6th and 7th stanzas are again in ABCB scheme. The 8th stanza’s scheme is AACC and the last stanza ends like a sermon where the line “I riseRead more

    The rhyme scheme of the poem is not consistent and it alternates. First three stanzas’ scheme is ABCB. Then it changes to ABCC in third stanza and the 4th, 5th, 6th and 7th stanzas are again in ABCB scheme. The 8th stanza’s scheme is AACC and the last stanza ends like a sermon where the line “I rise” is repeated three times.

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  1. Lucifer better to reign in hell than to serve in heaven

    The title of the poem is the message itself. The message is the resilience of human spirit against the adversity which comes from injustice of this world. The poem’s universal message is the proud faith and hope in human capacity to win beyond the dark phases of life and its hardships.

    The title of the poem is the message itself. The message is the resilience of human spirit against the adversity which comes from injustice of this world. The poem’s universal message is the proud faith and hope in human capacity to win beyond the dark phases of life and its hardships.

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  1. Lucifer better to reign in hell than to serve in heaven

    The poem gives us delight through the striking use of imagery. The imagery of oil industry is fitted into the second stanza like a parody. It says, “I've got oil wells pumping in my living room.” The grand image of cosmos is used here through “moons and suns” and “tides.” The pain of victims is exprRead more

    The poem gives us delight through the striking use of imagery. The imagery of oil industry is fitted into the second stanza like a parody. It says, “I’ve got oil wells pumping in my living room.” The grand image of cosmos is used here through “moons and suns” and “tides.” The pain of victims is expressed by the image which compares their falling shoulders to teardrops. The poet’s powerful feminity is expressed by the image of “diamonds at the meeting of thighs.” The hurtful past is shown through the image of night while the hope is shown through the image of a daybreak.

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  1. Lucifer better to reign in hell than to serve in heaven

    The poem brilliantly employs figurative language. It is full of similes and metaphors. She compares herself to dust, air and ocean across the poem which are similes. Her rising spirit is compared with moons and suns. Shoulders of victims are compared with teardrops. The difficulty of life is compareRead more

    The poem brilliantly employs figurative language. It is full of similes and metaphors.
    She compares herself to dust, air and ocean across the poem which are similes.
    Her rising spirit is compared with moons and suns.
    Shoulders of victims are compared with teardrops.
    The difficulty of life is compared with the tide.
    The shameful incidences of her life and black people in general is described as “the huts of history’s shame.”

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  1. Lucifer better to reign in hell than to serve in heaven

    The theme of the poem is the undefeatable nature of Black Americans. In general, it is the resilience of human spirit which can stand against all kinds of adversity. Pride of her own race and her gender in general is also a thematic concern of the poem.

    The theme of the poem is the undefeatable nature of Black Americans. In general, it is the resilience of human spirit which can stand against all kinds of adversity. Pride of her own race and her gender in general is also a thematic concern of the poem.

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