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    Anaphora- The recurrence of a word or phrase at the beginning of numerous lines, generally in order, is known as anaphora.  Oh, give us pleasure in the flowers to-day;  Oh, give us pleasure in the orchard white  And give us not to think so far away And make us happy in the happy bees, And make us haRead more

    • Anaphora- The recurrence of a word or phrase at the beginning of numerous lines, generally in order, is known as anaphora.  Oh, give us pleasure in the flowers to-day;  Oh, give us pleasure in the orchard white  And give us not to think so far away And make us happy in the happy bees, And make us happy in the darting bird  And off a blossom in mid air stands still. The swarm dilating round the perfect trees. The meteor that thrusts in with needle bill, The which it is reserved for God above
    • Imagery- Imagery is descriptive language or symbolism that evokes a mental image or other sorts of sensory perceptions. Give us pleasure in the orchard white, The swarm dilating round the perfect trees.
    • Repetition- The simple repetition of a word within a short space of words is known as repetition. And make us happy in the happy bees. For this is love and nothing else is love
    • Alliteration- The prominent repeating of similar starting consonant sounds in subsequent or closely linked syllables is known as alliteration. All simply in the springing of the year.

    A Prayer in the Spring Summary

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  1. The speaker in Frost's "A Prayer in Spring" offers a simple prayer to the Divine Father in a tone of contemplative joy, emphasizing on love and appreciation that is traditionally displayed during the Thanksgiving season.   A Prayer in the Spring Summary

    The speaker in Frost’s “A Prayer in Spring” offers a simple prayer to the Divine Father in a tone of contemplative joy, emphasizing on love and appreciation that is traditionally displayed during the Thanksgiving season.

     

    A Prayer in the Spring Summary

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  1. “A Prayer in Spring” is a four-stanza poem consisting of four lines each, called quatrains. These quatrains have a coherent rhyme scheme that follows the ‘aabb’ pattern.   A Prayer in the Spring Summary

    “A Prayer in Spring” is a four-stanza poem consisting of four lines each, called quatrains. These quatrains have a coherent rhyme scheme that follows the ‘aabb’ pattern.

     

    A Prayer in the Spring Summary

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  1. Lucifer better to reign in hell than to serve in heaven

    The theme of the poem is described through the image of a silk tent. The poem describes the love of a man for a woman and the relationship that they share. The poem is about the way that love brings together a lost couple.

    The theme of the poem is described through the image of a silk tent. The poem describes the love of a man for a woman and the relationship that they share. The poem is about the way that love brings together a lost couple.

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  1. The poem A Roadside Stand is a haiku poem with a seasonal appeal. The central idea is the depiction of nature and the importance of doing nothing. The poem A Roadside Stand conveys a sense of yearning for the past through its central theme of change. The speaker's childhood fascination with the roadRead more

    The poem A Roadside Stand is a haiku poem with a seasonal appeal. The central idea is the depiction of nature and the importance of doing nothing.

    The poem A Roadside Stand conveys a sense of yearning for the past through its central theme of change. The speaker’s childhood fascination with the roadside stand, which he remembers with nostalgia, has matured into a growing awareness of the reality of change. The speaker’s present contemplation of the roadside stand suggests a link with the past and foreshadows an awareness of the future.

    The poem’s central theme of change involves a literal description of the roadside stand, which the speaker describes with the imagery of a stopping point on a long journey. The speaker describes the roadside stand as a place where a traveller could stop and gather his thoughts, where he could eat, and where he could rest.

     

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