English Notes Latest Questions

  1. This poem has a myriad of poetic devices, some of which are as follows:   Apostrophe: Apostrophe can be observed when the persona directly addresses inanimate objects. This can be seen in the first line ‘O world! O life! O time!’   2. Eye Rhyme: In order to maintain the rhyme scheme, eye rRead more

    This poem has a myriad of poetic devices, some of which are as follows:

     

    1. Apostrophe:

    Apostrophe can be observed when the persona directly addresses inanimate objects. This can be seen in the first line ‘O world! O life! O time!’

     

    2. Eye Rhyme:

    In order to maintain the rhyme scheme, eye rhyme has been employed. It is an imperfect rhyme where two words that are pronounced differently are rhymed. This can be seen in the poem with the rhyming of ‘time’, ‘climb’ and ‘prime’.

     

    3. Metaphor:

    This can be seen when ‘time’ is said to have ‘last steps’, thus compared to a ladder or a stairwell to signify that the persona’s days are numbered.

     

    It can also be seen in the phrase ‘joy has taken flight’ where joy is compared to a bird that can fly away.

     

    4. Refrain:

    One line in the poem is repeated at the end of stanzas for added emphasis. The line ‘No more—Oh, never more!’ is the refrain in this poem.

     

    A Lament Summary

     

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  1. The central idea of the poem revolves around the poet persona’s feeling of deep regret and disappointment. Each and every thing in his life aggrieves him. He laments, as though he were already dead.   A Lament Summary

    The central idea of the poem revolves around the poet persona’s feeling of deep regret and disappointment. Each and every thing in his life aggrieves him. He laments, as though he were already dead.

     

    A Lament Summary

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  1. This answer was edited.

    Assonance: Assonance is the repetition of vowel sounds in the same line. For example, “From my wings that shaken the dews that waken”. Alliteration: Alliteration is the repetition of consonant sounds in the same line in quick succession. For example, “From the seas and the streams”. Consonance: ConsRead more

    • Assonance: Assonance is the repetition of vowel sounds in the same line. For example, “From my wings that shaken the dews that waken”.
    • Alliteration: Alliteration is the repetition of consonant sounds in the same line in quick succession. For example, “From the seas and the streams”.
    • Consonance: Consonance is the repetition of consonant sounds in the same line. For example, “I wield the flail of the lashing hail”.
    • Enjambment: It is a verse that does not come to an end in the same line, but continues in the next line. For example; “I bear light shade for the leaves when laid In their noonday dreams.”
    • Hyperbole: Hyperbole is a device used to exaggerate a statement for the sake of emphasis. For example, “And the nursling of the sky”.
    • Imagery: Imagery is used to make readers perceive things involving their five senses. For example, “I wield the flail of the lashing hail”.
    • Personification: Personification is to give human qualities to inanimate objects. The cloud is personified throughout the poem. For example, “I bring fresh showers for the thirsting flowers”, “I am the daughter of Earth and Water” and “I silently laugh at my own cenotaph.”
    • Simile: It is a device used to compare an object or a person with something else to make the meanings clear to the readers. For example, “Like a child from the womb, like a ghost from the tomb.”

    The Cloud Summary

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  1. This answer was edited.

    Shelly imagines the cloud as a living being and ascribes individuality to her through a set of moving images. She is the daughter of earth and water and the nursling of the sky. She can speak, move and act like a human being. She brings fresh showers for the thirsty flowers. She bears light shade foRead more

    Shelly imagines the cloud as a living being and ascribes individuality to her through a set of moving images. She is the daughter of earth and water and the nursling of the sky. She can speak, move and act like a human being. She brings fresh showers for the thirsty flowers. She bears light shade for the leaves and helps the buds to bloom. The cloud is whimsical and cruel too. She lashes the earth with hailstones and whitens the green field. But this does not last long. Soon she brings torrential rain and the fields become green again. The cloud then disappears from the sky with deep roars of thunder.

     

    The Cloud Summary

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  1. Ans. The winter is described as deadly and lifeless season in the poem. It is the season in which several birds die while several other migrate, plants and flowers die, fishes lay stiffened in the frozen water. The people gather around the fire to tackle the harsh winter. Summary, Theme, Rhyme SchemRead more

    Ans. The winter is described as deadly and lifeless season in the poem. It is the season in which several birds die while several other migrate, plants and flowers die, fishes lay stiffened in the frozen water. The people gather around the fire to tackle the harsh winter.

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  1. Lucifer better to reign in hell than to serve in heaven

    Power of the king and father is portrayed through an ageing and struggling Lear. He struggles to retain his authority in regards to his ambitious daughters. The same is depicted through the betrayal of Gloucester by his bastard son Edmund. Lear’s inability to sustain the power he commanded as  a kinRead more

    Power of the king and father is portrayed through an ageing and struggling Lear. He struggles to retain his authority in regards to his ambitious daughters. The same is depicted through the betrayal of Gloucester by his bastard son Edmund.

    Lear’s inability to sustain the power he commanded as  a king led to his loss of power as the family patriarch, causing him to lose his mind, life and his one daughter who truly cared for him, Cordelia.

    The lust of power drives Cordelia and Goneril to destroy their father’s life as well ruin their own marriages.They end up becoming objects of mutual hatred ending with their deaths. Similarly, Edmund meets his tragic end at the sword of Edgar, the step brother he tried to murder.

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