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  1. The poem Nothing Gold Can Stay by Robert Frost consists of 8 lines which are divided into four couplets. The rhyme scheme of the poem is AABB CCDD EEFF GGHH. Read: Summary of Nothing Gold Can Stay Analysis of Nothing Gold Can Stay

    The poem Nothing Gold Can Stay by Robert Frost consists of 8 lines which are divided into four couplets. The rhyme scheme of the poem is AABB CCDD EEFF GGHH.

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  1. The line "So Eden sank to grief" contains allusion or in other words literary reference to the Biblical anecdote of Adam and Eve who were in the Paradise until they ate the fruit of  The Forbidden Tree". Read: Summary of Nothing Gold Can Stay Analysis of Nothing Gold Can Stay

    The line “So Eden sank to grief” contains allusion or in other words literary reference to the Biblical anecdote of Adam and Eve who were in the Paradise until they ate the fruit of  The Forbidden Tree”.

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  1. The poem Nothing Gold Can Stay was written in 1923 and published in the month of October of same year. Read: Summary of Nothing Gold Can Stay Analysis of Nothing Gold Can Stay

    The poem Nothing Gold Can Stay was written in 1923 and published in the month of October of same year.

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  1. "Nothing Gold Can Stay" by Robert Frost is a short poem having just 8 lines. The poem is about nature like most of the other poems of the poet. Read: Summary of Nothing Gold Can Stay Analysis of Nothing Gold Can Stay

    “Nothing Gold Can Stay” by Robert Frost is a short poem having just 8 lines. The poem is about nature like most of the other poems of the poet.

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    2. Analysis of Nothing Gold Can Stay
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  1. The poem’s thematic concern is universal. It talks about the very essential feature of everything we see around us. It talks of inevitable decay and change which is common to all. Read: Summary of Nothing Gold Can Stay Analysis of Nothing Gold Can Stay

    The poem’s thematic concern is universal. It talks about the very essential feature of everything we see around us. It talks of inevitable decay and change which is common to all.

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  1. It is an example of Allusion which is a literary device. It means a passing reference or mention of something from history or anywhere else. Here, it refers to the biblical Garden of Eden. Read: Summary of Nothing Gold Can Stay Analysis of Nothing Gold Can Stay

    It is an example of Allusion which is a literary device. It means a passing reference or mention of something from history or anywhere else. Here, it refers to the biblical Garden of Eden.

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    2. Analysis of Nothing Gold Can Stay
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  1. It is the use of the same consonant at the beginning of each stressed syllable in a line of verse. The examples in the poem are- “her hardest hue to hold” "Dawn goes down to day” Read: Summary of Nothing Gold Can Stay Analysis of Nothing Gold Can Stay

    It is the use of the same consonant at the beginning of each stressed syllable in a line of verse. The examples in the poem are-

    • “her hardest hue to hold”
    • “Dawn goes down to day”

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  1. The tone of the poem is fatalistic. The poet is in despair that Nature itself reveals this to us that nothing is permanent and everything is transient. Read: Summary of Nothing Gold Can Stay Analysis of Nothing Gold Can Stay

    The tone of the poem is fatalistic. The poet is in despair that Nature itself reveals this to us that nothing is permanent and everything is transient.

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  1. Following literary devices are used in the poem – Imagery – Frost creates sense imagery. For example, “Nature’s first green”, “dawn goes down to day” and “leaf subsiding to leaf” Personification – It is the major device of the poem because here everything inanimate including Nature is provided withRead more

    Following literary devices are used in the poem –

    1. Imagery – Frost creates sense imagery. For example, “Nature’s first green”, “dawn goes down to day” and “leaf subsiding to leaf”
    2. Personification – It is the major device of the poem because here everything inanimate including Nature is provided with human qualities. “Nature” is personified here.
    3. Allusion – It is any kind of reference given in the work. Here, the poet alludes to the biblical Garden of Eden.
    4. Metaphor – It is a figure of speech in which an expression is used to refer to something that it does not literally denote in order to suggest a similarity. Here, the description of Nature is an extended metaphor for the transience which is natural to everything we call real for us.
    5. Alliteration- It is the repetition of sound in the same line. i.e. “So dawn goes down to day.”

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  1. Realistically, it describes the earliest phase when the leaf comes out of a plant. For a very short period, its colour is gold and very soon it becomes green. So for this short period, it looks more like flower. Read: Summary of Nothing Gold Can Stay Analysis of Nothing Gold Can Stay

    Realistically, it describes the earliest phase when the leaf comes out of a plant. For a very short period, its colour is gold and very soon it becomes green. So for this short period, it looks more like flower.

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    2. Analysis of Nothing Gold Can Stay
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