English Notes Latest Questions

  1. The poem The Caged Bird by Maya Angelou has thirty-eight lines divided into six stanzas. The first stanza has seven lines. The second stanza has seven lines. The third stanza has eight lines. The fourth and fifth stanzas have four lines each. The last stanza has eight lines. The Caged Bird Stanza-wiRead more

    The poem The Caged Bird by Maya Angelou has thirty-eight lines divided into six stanzas.

    1. The first stanza has seven lines.
    2. The second stanza has seven lines.
    3. The third stanza has eight lines.
    4. The fourth and fifth stanzas have four lines each.
    5. The last stanza has eight lines.

    The Caged Bird Stanza-wise Summary & Explanation

    See less
  1. The poem "Still I Rise" has nine stanzas that are divided into several sets of lines. Eighth stanza has six lines, ninth stanza has nine lines, the first seven stanzas are known as quatrains, which have four lines each. The rhyme pattern for the first seven stanzas is ABCB, the eighth is ABABCC, andRead more

    The poem “Still I Rise” has nine stanzas that are divided into several sets of lines. Eighth stanza has six lines, ninth stanza has nine lines, the first seven stanzas are known as quatrains, which have four lines each. The rhyme pattern for the first seven stanzas is ABCB, the eighth is ABABCC, and the ninth is ABABCCBBB.

     

     Still i rise summary

    See less
  1. 1. Alliteration- When two or more words that start with the same letter are used consecutively or at least closely together, alliteration occurs. Eg. "gifts" and "gave" in stanza nine, and "huts of history" in line one of the eighth stanza.   still i rise summary

    1. Alliteration– When two or more words that start with the same letter are used consecutively or at least closely together, alliteration occurs. Eg. “gifts” and “gave” in stanza nine, and “huts of history” in line one of the eighth stanza.

     

    still i rise summary

    See less
  1. The speaker is constantly targeted by society in an effort to diminish them, but she is almost powerless to resist. The speaker admits that she might suffer discrimination in society, however, the speaker's response to this treatment is not simply survival; rather, it is prospering, which enrages heRead more

    The speaker is constantly targeted by society in an effort to diminish them, but she is almost powerless to resist. The speaker admits that she might suffer discrimination in society, however, the speaker’s response to this treatment is not simply survival; rather, it is prospering, which enrages her oppressor.

    still i rise summary

    See less
  1. The rhyme scheme is not constant. In the first stanza, the rhyme scheme is aabbccddeeffgg. In the next stanzas from stanzas 2 to five there isn't a rhyme scheme and the poem is blank verse.   Woman Work Summary

    The rhyme scheme is not constant. In the first stanza, the rhyme scheme is aabbccddeeffgg. In the next stanzas from stanzas 2 to five there isn’t a rhyme scheme and the poem is blank verse.

     

    Woman Work Summary

    See less
  1. Repetition: The use of the same word or phrase multiple times. Repetition is used only in the first 14 lines. The word “The” has been used multiple times at the beginning of the lines. Alliteration: The repetition of the same letter sound across the start of several words in a line of text. For examRead more

    1. Repetition: The use of the same word or phrase multiple times. Repetition is used only in the first 14 lines. The word “The” has been used multiple times at the beginning of the lines.
    2. Alliteration: The repetition of the same letter sound across the start of several words in a line of text. For example, “Then see about the sick”.
    3. Personification: A poetic device where animals, plants, or even inanimate objects, are given human qualities. For example,

    “Fall gently, snowflakes

    Cover me with white

    Cold icy kisses and

    Let me rest tonight.”

     

    Woman Work Summary

     

    See less
  1. “Woman Work” describes the pressure that women, and Black women, in particular, face to work and care for other people. The speaker must cook, clean, pick cotton, cut sugar cane, and take care of everyone around her, finding brief respite only in the freedom offered by the natural world. Woman WorkRead more

    “Woman Work” describes the pressure that women, and Black women, in particular, face to work and care for other people. The speaker must cook, clean, pick cotton, cut sugar cane, and take care of everyone around her, finding brief respite only in the freedom offered by the natural world.

    Woman Work Summary

    See less
  1. Lucifer better to reign in hell than to serve in heaven

    In the poem Still I rise, it means that her enemy her oppressors may abuse her with their words but she won’t give up anyway. Shooting words mean to use language for wrong purpose.

    In the poem Still I rise, it means that her enemy her oppressors may abuse her with their words but she won’t give up anyway. Shooting words mean to use language for wrong purpose.

    See less
  1. Lucifer better to reign in hell than to serve in heaven

    There are in total four stanzas without any constant numbers of lines. The poem is written without any rhyming scheme. It uses refrain too which means it repeats certain sentences again and again such as ‘Phenomenal woman’ and the part ‘that’s me’.

    There are in total four stanzas without any constant numbers of lines. The poem is written without any rhyming scheme. It uses refrain too which means it repeats certain sentences again and again such as ‘Phenomenal woman’ and the part ‘that’s me’.

    See less