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  1. The contrast between the aspirations of the American Dream and the hard reality of American life is highlighted in the poem "Let America Be America Again." The subjects of identity, freedom, and equality are all addressed in this poem.   Let America be America Again Summary

    The contrast between the aspirations of the American Dream and the hard reality of American life is highlighted in the poem “Let America Be America Again.” The subjects of identity, freedom, and equality are all addressed in this poem.

     

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    Alliteration- Alliteration is the repetition of identical initial consonant sounds. E.g., Let America be the dream the dreamers dreamed. Let America be America Again Summary

    1. Alliteration- Alliteration is the repetition of identical initial consonant sounds. E.g., Let America be the dream the dreamers dreamed.

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    The poet argues that the promise of freedom and justice for all has not yet been accomplished in the United States. Hughes explores the nuanced connection between the American Dream and discrimination. It still holds true in today's world just as it did in the middle of the 1930s.   Let AmericaRead more

    The poet argues that the promise of freedom and justice for all has not yet been accomplished in the United States. Hughes explores the nuanced connection between the American Dream and discrimination. It still holds true in today’s world just as it did in the middle of the 1930s.

     

    Let America be America Again Summary

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  1. Langston Hughes' thirteen-line poem "The Negro Speaks of Rivers" doesn't follow any particular rhyme pattern. The poem is written in free verse because the lines also do not follow a metrical structure.   The Negro speaks of rivers summary

    Langston Hughes’ thirteen-line poem “The Negro Speaks of Rivers” doesn’t follow any particular rhyme pattern. The poem is written in free verse because the lines also do not follow a metrical structure.

     

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  1. Enjambment: It is a literary device in which a line of poetry carries its idea or thought over to the next line without a grammatical pause. For example, I heard the singing of the Mississippi when Abe Lincoln/ went down to New Orleans, and I've seen its muddy/ bosom turn all golden in the sunset. IRead more

    1. Enjambment: It is a literary device in which a line of poetry carries its idea or thought over to the next line without a grammatical pause. For example, I heard the singing of the Mississippi when Abe Lincoln/ went down to New Orleans, and I’ve seen its muddy/ bosom turn all golden in the sunset.
    2. Imagery: It is a vivid and vibrant form of description that appeals to readers’ senses and imagination. For example, “I’ve known rivers:/ Ancient, dusky rivers.
    3. Repetition: It is the primary way of creating a pattern through rhythm. In order to emphasize to the reader, the speaker’s close relationship to the bodies of water, the poem ends with a repetition of the opening lines “I’ve known rivers”.

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  1. ‘The Negro Speaks of Rivers’ by Langston Hughes is written from the viewpoint of a guy who has lived alongside the banks of the most significant rivers throughout the world's great ages. The speaker of the poem claims to be highly familiar with rivers at the outset. He wishes to share a few in partiRead more

    ‘The Negro Speaks of Rivers’ by Langston Hughes is written from the viewpoint of a guy who has lived alongside the banks of the most significant rivers throughout the world’s great ages. The speaker of the poem claims to be highly familiar with rivers at the outset. He wishes to share a few in particular with the reader. They are all among the world’s largest and longest. Additionally, they have all hosted some of the world’s most significant historical moments and civilizations. The speaker has witnessed humankind’s earliest moments alongside the Euphrates, taken part in the construction of the Pyramids, and heard Abraham Lincoln saunter down the Mississippi while listening to the river.

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  1. The Rain has been described as silver rain because the poet remembers the proverb, “Every cloud has a silver lining.” i.e. it brings hope and life.

    The Rain has been described as silver rain because the poet remembers the proverb, “Every cloud has a silver lining.” i.e. it brings hope and life.

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