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  1. Because there is a recurrent and uncompromising need to court the woman inside the privacy of a room and consummate sexually, is not found in most important poets before Donne. In the poem, the precinct of the lover's room becomes into a parallel world, a better one, by the fact of its occupancy byRead more

    Because there is a recurrent and uncompromising need to court the woman inside the privacy of a room and consummate sexually, is not found in most important poets before Donne. In the poem, the precinct of the lover’s room becomes into a parallel world, a better one, by the fact of its occupancy by the lovers.

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  1. The poem 'The Good Morrow' by John Donne is a metaphysical love poem in nature. Here he emphasizes the new chapter of their relationship. He uses the metaphor of the seven sleepers who were slept for more than 100 years in a hid out, in which he finds the similarity in their relationship as they werRead more

    The poem ‘The Good Morrow’ by John Donne is a metaphysical love poem in nature. Here he emphasizes the new chapter of their relationship. He uses the metaphor of the seven sleepers who were slept for more than 100 years in a hid out, in which he finds the similarity in their relationship as they were slept for years. As if their feelings have not been appropriate. They indulged themselves in country pleasures. As their love was only physical but not from the inner core of heart .

    But in the second stanza, the poet finds the true awakening. After a long slumber, their souls awakened only to mingle and merge with each other souls originating from the same source displays a maddening thirst of assimilation into each other. They are out of fear. They find a whole world in their own ‘little room’. They find each other as they are the two halfs of their own world of love. Their love in truly transformed from physical to platonic love.

    The title of the poem truly discloses the past and present state of the speaker and his lady love’s spiritual love. Here it plays the appropriate role for justification the metaphysical or Platonic love.

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  1. The word "Metaphysical" applies in an obvious sense to Donne's poetry insofar as that he regularly speaks of the world of souls and spirits- the world beyond the physical- meta-physical.

    The word “Metaphysical” applies in an obvious sense to Donne’s poetry insofar as that he regularly speaks of the world of souls and spirits- the world beyond the physicalmeta-physical.

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  1. John Donne has cleverly and extensively used tools of figures of speech in this poem, mainly by use of simile, metaphor, pun, personification, hyperbole etc. The title of the poem is itself a metaphor for  "waking up to a new life" Similarly, use of Hyperbole, metaphor, simile, and pun is used in thRead more

    John Donne has cleverly and extensively used tools of figures of speech in this poem, mainly by use of simile, metaphor, pun, personification, hyperbole etc.

    The title of the poem is itself a metaphor for  “waking up to a new life”
    Similarly, use of Hyperbole, metaphor, simile, and pun is used in the opening lines,

    “I Wonder by my troth, what thou, and I
    Did, till we lov’d? were we not wean’d till then?
    But suck’d on countrey pleasures, childishly?
    Or snorted we in the seaven sleepers den?”

     

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  1. The poem is written from the love chamber of the two lovers. The sun's rays enter through the windows and mark the end of the night. The bed is the centre around which the sun revolves. Sun, as the source of vigour and vitality, is invited to shine upon the lovers. The paradigm of the voyeuristic thRead more

    The poem is written from the love chamber of the two lovers. The sun’s rays enter through the windows and mark the end of the night. The bed is the centre around which the sun revolves. Sun, as the source of vigour and vitality, is invited to shine upon the lovers. The paradigm of the voyeuristic third person being shunned and later being invited is invisible in this poem.

    This is essentially a love poem like the Donne’s The Good Morrow.

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