English Notes Latest Questions

  1. This poem is divided into seven stanzas consisting of four lines each. It follows the rhyme scheme ‘aabb’ in each stanza.   My Furry Friend Summary

    This poem is divided into seven stanzas consisting of four lines each. It follows the rhyme scheme ‘aabb’ in each stanza.

     

    My Furry Friend Summary

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    Eye Rhyme: In order to maintain the rhyme scheme, words that appear to rhyme have been used. Examples would be ‘puppy’, ‘happy’ and ‘fun’, ‘conversation’. Simile: The lines ‘As small as a rat’ and ‘Nibbles like a mouse’ compare the puppy to being a rat and a mouse with the usage of the words ‘as’ anRead more

    1. Eye Rhyme: In order to maintain the rhyme scheme, words that appear to rhyme have been used. Examples would be ‘puppy’, ‘happy’ and ‘fun’, ‘conversation’.
    2. Simile: The lines ‘As small as a rat’ and ‘Nibbles like a mouse’ compare the puppy to being a rat and a mouse with the usage of the words ‘as’ and ‘like’ respectively, making it a simile.
    3. Alliteration: An example would be ‘small in size’.

     

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  1. The central idea of the poem is the nature of a dog. From being a small puppy to a fully grown dog, the persona traces their pet dog’s habitual traits and characteristics.   My Furry Friend Summary

    The central idea of the poem is the nature of a dog. From being a small puppy to a fully grown dog, the persona traces their pet dog’s habitual traits and characteristics.

     

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  1. This poem is divided into eight stanzas consisting of four lines each. It does not follow a rhyme scheme.   Razia, the tigress Summary

    This poem is divided into eight stanzas consisting of four lines each. It does not follow a rhyme scheme.

     

    Razia, the tigress Summary

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  1. This answer was edited.

    Simile: ‘His claw fell like a giant club’. This line compares the force behind the claw of a tiger to that of a giant club with the usage of the word ‘like’, making it a simile. Alliteration: A couple of examples would be ‘crawl and crouch’ and ‘hyenas hound’. Enjambment: Sentences run over to the nRead more

    1. Simile: ‘His claw fell like a giant club’. This line compares the force behind the claw of a tiger to that of a giant club with the usage of the word ‘like’, making it a simile.
    2. Alliteration: A couple of examples would be ‘crawl and crouch’ and ‘hyenas hound’.
    3. Enjambment: Sentences run over to the next line in this poem to give a sense of continuity. A couple of examples would be ‘So he would belly-crawl and crouch/ And take a long circular route’, and ‘His claw fell like a giant club/ On neck and antler-both were crushed’.

     

    Razia, the tigress Summary

     

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  1. The central idea of this poem is tiger, the fierce animal. For all its ferociousness, it was poached and hunted, forced to live in fear of hyenas, a lowly creature, and humans with guns, a weapon it is not accustomed to. Razia, the tigress Summary

    The central idea of this poem is tiger, the fierce animal. For all its ferociousness, it was poached and hunted, forced to live in fear of hyenas, a lowly creature, and humans with guns, a weapon it is not accustomed to.

    Razia, the tigress Summary

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  1. Rhetorical Question- A question asked in order to create a dramatic effect or to make a point rather than to get an answer. Examples- Whom dost thou worship in this lonely dark corner of a temple with doors all shut?”, “Deliverance? / Where is this deliverance to be found?”, “What harm is there if tRead more

    Rhetorical Question- A question asked in order to create a dramatic effect or to make a point rather than to get an answer. Examples- Whom dost thou worship in this lonely dark corner of a temple with doors all shut?”, “Deliverance? / Where is this deliverance to be found?”, “What harm is there if thy clothes become tattered and stained?”

     

    Open thy eye and see thy God Summary

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  1. Tagore believes that God is where the common hardworking people are. God does not stay stuck in the dark corners of temples, instead he works with the men who tirelessly toil to till our fields and build our roads, and keep society going.   Open thy eye and see thy God Summary

    Tagore believes that God is where the common hardworking people are. God does not stay stuck in the dark corners of temples, instead he works with the men who tirelessly toil to till our fields and build our roads, and keep society going.

     

    Open thy eye and see thy God Summary

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