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  1. The poet states clearly that death is not a thing to worried about. By the death a person gets rid of his all worldly problems and onwards he will remain free like the wind. So it can be said that death is a reward instead of punishment.

    The poet states clearly that death is not a thing to worried about. By the death a person gets rid of his all worldly problems and onwards he will remain free like the wind. So it can be said that death is a reward instead of punishment.

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  1. Since "Sonnet 43" comprises 14 lines and a set rhyme scheme of abba abba cdcdcd, it is considered to be a sonnet. One of the two main sonnet forms, the Petrarchan sonnet, is traditionally structured in this way. How do i love thee Summary

    Since “Sonnet 43” comprises 14 lines and a set rhyme scheme of abba abba cdcdcd, it is considered to be a sonnet. One of the two main sonnet forms, the Petrarchan sonnet, is traditionally structured in this way.

    How do i love thee Summary

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  1. 1. Simile- E.g. “I love thee freely, as men strive for right” 2. Alliteration – E.g. “purely” and “praise”   How do i love thee Summary

    1. Simile– E.g. “I love thee freely, as men strive for right”

    2. Alliteration – E.g. “purely” and “praise”

     

    How do i love thee Summary

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  1. True love is displayed in "How Do I Love Thee?" as constant and immortal. The poem also highlights a conflict between love as an attachment to worldly life and love as something that is greater than earthly existence. The speaker sets out on a journey to list all the reasons she loves her spouse. ThRead more

    True love is displayed in “How Do I Love Thee?” as constant and immortal. The poem also highlights a conflict between love as an attachment to worldly life and love as something that is greater than earthly existence. The speaker sets out on a journey to list all the reasons she loves her spouse. Thus, the poem is seeking to rationally defend love. The poet uses metaphors to powerfully convey her love. She prays to God to grant her the ability to love her partner beyond life.

     

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    The structure of this text, as said before, is a soliloquy. It consists of 33 lines and is written in blank words with iambic pentameter. It does not follow a rhyme scheme.   To be or not to be Summary

    The structure of this text, as said before, is a soliloquy. It consists of 33 lines and is written in blank words with iambic pentameter. It does not follow a rhyme scheme.

     

    To be or not to be Summary

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  1. This answer was edited.

    Personification: In the line ‘The slings and arrows of outrageous fortune’, fortune is personified and given human attributes. Syncope: A couple of examples would be ‘wish’d’, and ‘dispriz’d’. Metaphor: An example would be ‘sea of troubles’.   To be or not to be

    1. Personification: In the line ‘The slings and arrows of outrageous fortune’, fortune is personified and given human attributes.
    2. Syncope: A couple of examples would be ‘wish’d’, and ‘dispriz’d’.
    1. Metaphor: An example would be ‘sea of troubles’.

     

    To be or not to be

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  1. This answer was edited.

    The central idea of this soliloquy is death. Hamlet explores the concept of death and the nature of humans to be averse towards it. To be or not to be summary

    The central idea of this soliloquy is death. Hamlet explores the concept of death and the nature of humans to be averse towards it.

    To be or not to be summary

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  1. This excerpt is not a poem per se, but is a dialogue delivered by Duke Senior. The stanzas here are thus merely for convenience. The lines do not follow a rhyme scheme.   Sweet are the uses of adversity Summary

    This excerpt is not a poem per se, but is a dialogue delivered by Duke Senior. The stanzas here are thus merely for convenience. The lines do not follow a rhyme scheme.

     

    Sweet are the uses of adversity Summary

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  1. This extract is not a poem. Even then, it has a myriad of poetic devices, some of which are as follows: Metaphor: One example would be the phrase ‘penalty of Adam’ which is used to draw a parallel to the Duke Senior’s own banishment. Alliteration: Some examples would be ‘painted pomp’, ‘churlish chiRead more

    This extract is not a poem. Even then, it has a myriad of poetic devices, some of which are as follows:

    1. Metaphor: One example would be the phrase ‘penalty of Adam’ which is used to draw a parallel to the Duke Senior’s own banishment.
    2. Alliteration: Some examples would be ‘painted pomp’, ‘churlish chiding’, and ‘Sermons in stones’.
    3. Simile: The line ‘Which, like the toad, ugly and venomous’ compares adversity to that of an ugly, poisonous toad with the usage of the word ‘like’.
    4. Allusion: ‘penalty of Adam’ is a biblical allusion where Adam’s exile alludes to Duke Senior’s banishment.

     

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