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  1. The poem "Dover Beach" is divided into four stanzas, each with a different amount of lines. They are fourteen to six lines long on average. There is no regular rhyme pattern.   Dover Beach Summary

    The poem “Dover Beach” is divided into four stanzas, each with a different amount of lines. They are fourteen to six lines long on average. There is no regular rhyme pattern.

     

    Dover Beach Summary

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  1. Alliteration : Alliteration is the practice of starting several words with the same consonant sound. For example, in verse four, "lying," "like," and "land." Allusion: A poetic device that can allude to something that is not directly related to it. Eg , the poet makes a reference to the Greek dramatRead more

    1. Alliteration : Alliteration is the practice of starting several words with the same consonant sound. For example, in verse four, “lying,” “like,” and “land.”
    2. Allusion: A poetic device that can allude to something that is not directly related to it. Eg , the poet makes a reference to the Greek dramatist Sophocles.
    3. Simile: “like” or “as” is used to compare two items. Eg.   To lay before us like a world of dreams.
    4. Imagery: Imagery is the use of exceptionally engrossing descriptions to enable readers to vividly understand a scene. Eg, “The moon lies fair, the tide is full.

    Dover Beach Summary

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  1. The poem's straightforward message is that everyone can find faith via love. The speaker urges people to return to unwavering faith and put hatred and conflict behind.   Dover Beach Summary

    The poem’s straightforward message is that everyone can find faith via love. The speaker urges people to return to unwavering faith and put hatred and conflict behind.

     

    Dover Beach Summary

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  1. The meaning of the simile “lay like the folds of a bright girdle furled” stands for the greatness of an era in England when it was at the peak of commercial success and also during that time when people were happier and felt like they belonged there.

    The meaning of the simile “lay like the folds of a bright girdle furled” stands for the greatness of an era in England when it was at the peak of commercial success and also during that time when people were happier and felt like they belonged there.

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