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  1. There are no stanza breaks among the twenty-three lines that make up the poem, "Africa." It is composed in free verse without a definite rhyme scheme or meter.   Africa Summary

    There are no stanza breaks among the twenty-three lines that make up the poem, “Africa.” It is composed in free verse without a definite rhyme scheme or meter.

     

    Africa Summary

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  1. Alliteration – similar starting sounds repeated in following or closely related syllables. E.g. But your blood”, “beautiful black blood”, “back that never breaks”, “faded flowers”, “bit by bit.   Metonymy- Metonymy is a figure of speech in which a notion is referred by the name of another ideaRead more

    1. Alliteration – similar starting sounds repeated in following or closely related syllables. E.g. But your blood”, “beautiful black blood”, “back that never breaks”, “faded flowers”, “bit by bit.

     

    1. Metonymy– Metonymy is a figure of speech in which a notion is referred by the name of another idea  that is intimately related to it. E.g. But your blood flows in my veins, Your beautiful black blood that irrigates the fields, The blood of your sweat.

    Africa Summary

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  1. The poem is a reminiscence of Africa, a place the author first learned about through his grandmother's song. His descriptions of the history of European colonization in Africa and the resilience of the African people are fascinating.   Africa Summary

    The poem is a reminiscence of Africa, a place the author first learned about through his grandmother’s song. His descriptions of the history of European colonization in Africa and the resilience of the African people are fascinating.

     

    Africa Summary

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