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  1. The tone of the poem Composed Upon Westminster Bridge is relaxing and calm. Composed Upon Westminster Bridge Poem Summary

    The tone of the poem Composed Upon Westminster Bridge is relaxing and calm.

    Composed Upon Westminster Bridge Poem Summary

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  1. In the poem Composed Upon Westminster Bridge, speaker is the poet, William Wordsworth himself. Composed Upon Westminster Bridge Poem Summary

    In the poem Composed Upon Westminster Bridge, speaker is the poet, William Wordsworth himself.

    Composed Upon Westminster Bridge Poem Summary

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  1. The rhyme scheme of the poem Composed Upon Westminster Bridge ABBAABBA CDCDCD. Composed Upon Westminster Bridge Poem Summary

    The rhyme scheme of the poem Composed Upon Westminster Bridge ABBAABBA CDCDCD.

    Composed Upon Westminster Bridge Poem Summary

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  1. The speaker begins by asserting that the view before him just might be the best thing in the world. It would be a very 'dull' person who could pass through without stopping to appreciate the 'majesty' of what he sees. And what is this splendid sight? That of a mighty city, full of the amazing accompRead more

    The speaker begins by asserting that the view before him just might be the best thing in the world. It would be a very ‘dull’ person who could pass through without stopping to appreciate the ‘majesty’ of what he sees. And what is this splendid sight? That of a mighty city, full of the amazing accomplishments of man. ‘Ships, towers, domes, theatres, and temples,’ spread before the speaker.

    But these man-made marvels have yet to come to life in the early morning. The buildings and ships are seen as part of the greater setting: the natural landscape. The sun rises over the quiet scene, and the river moves along on its natural path. For the brief time between sunrise and the beginning of the workday, the speaker feels ‘a calm so deep.’ For at this moment, civilization sleeps, and the beating heart of man-made constructs is ‘lying still.’

    Composed Upon Westminster Bridge Poem Summary

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  1. Following figures of speech/literary devices have been used in the poem: Assonance: Assonance is the repetition of vowel sounds in the same line. For example, the sound of /o/ in “Dull would he be of soul who could pass by” and the sound of /i/ in “All bright and glittering in the smokeless air.” CoRead more

    Following figures of speech/literary devices have been used in the poem:

    1. Assonance: Assonance is the repetition of vowel sounds in the same line. For example, the sound of /o/ in “Dull would he be of soul who could pass by” and the sound of /i/ in “All bright and glittering in the smokeless air.”
    2. Consonance: Consonance is the repetition of consonant sounds in the same line such as the sound of /l/ in “splendour, valley, rock, or hill;” and the sound of /h/ in “And all that mighty heart” and /s/ sound in “Ships, towers, domes, theatres, and temples lie.”
    3. Enjambment: It is defined as a thought in verse that does not come to an end at a line break; instead, it rolls over to the next line. For example,“Dull would he be of soul who could pass by A sight so touching in its majesty.”
    4. Hyperbole: Hyperbole is a device used to exaggerate a statement for the sake of emphasis. Wordsworth has used this device in the opening lines poem as he exaggerates the beauty of London city. For example, “Earth has not anything to show more fair: Dull would he be of soul who could pass by.
    5. Imagery: Imagery is used to make readers perceive things involving their five senses. For example, “The river glideth at his own sweet will” and “This City now doth, like a garment, wear.”
    6. Personification: Personification is to give human qualities to inanimate objects. In the fourth line “This City now doth, like a garment, wear”, the city is personified.
    7. Simile: It is a figure of speech used to compare an object or person with something else to make the meanings clear to the readers. For example, “This City now doth, like a garment, wear”.

    Composed Upon Westminster Bridge

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