English Notes Latest Questions

  1. Alliteration: The repetition of the same letter sound across the start of several words in a line of text. For example, “This is the page whose letters shall be seen” Personification: A poetic device where animals, plants, or even inanimate objects, are given human qualities. For example, “These areRead more

    1. Alliteration: The repetition of the same letter sound across the start of several words in a line of text. For example, “This is the page whose letters shall be seen”
    2. Personification: A poetic device where animals, plants, or even inanimate objects, are given human qualities. For example, “These are the lines that heaven-commanded Toil”.

    The ploughman Summary

    See less
    • 0
  1. The poet described his writing ability and also compared it with a farmer’s work. He explained both works are of creativity. Just the tools for both are different but it functions and results in the same in the end. The Ploughman Summary

    The poet described his writing ability and also compared it with a farmer’s work. He explained both works are of creativity. Just the tools for both are different but it functions and results in the same in the end.

    The Ploughman Summary

    See less
    • 1
  1. Personification- Personification is a figure of speech in which an idea or thing is given human attributes and/or feelings or is spoken of as if it were human. The wind that announces daybreak is personified in this poem. Alliteration- It is the occurrence of the same sound at the beginning of closeRead more

    1. Personification– Personification is a figure of speech in which an idea or thing is given human attributes and/or feelings or is spoken of as if it were human. The wind that announces daybreak is personified in this poem.
    2. Alliteration– It is the occurrence of the same sound at the beginning of closely connected words. Examples- “O mists, make room”, “chanticleer, / Your clarion”
    3. Metaphor– A metaphor directly refers to one thing by mentioning another. Here, “leafy banners” is a metaphor for the trees’ branches.

     

    Daybreak Summary

    See less
    • 0
  1. The central idea of the poem is the dawn. The night is over and as the day breaks out, a wind emerges from the see to announce the arrival of the new day. It sweeps over land and sea, asking everyone to wake up because the day had started.   Daybreak Summary

    The central idea of the poem is the dawn. The night is over and as the day breaks out, a wind emerges from the see to announce the arrival of the new day. It sweeps over land and sea, asking everyone to wake up because the day had started.

     

    Daybreak Summary

    See less
    • 0
  1. Enjambment: Enjambment is the continuation of a sentence or clause across a line break. For example, “But all sorts of things and weather Must be taken in together,” Personification: A poetic device where animals, plants, or even inanimate objects, are given human qualities. For example, “A very preRead more

    1. Enjambment: Enjambment is the continuation of a sentence or clause across a line break. For example,

    “But all sorts of things and weather

    Must be taken in together,”

    1. Personification: A poetic device where animals, plants, or even inanimate objects, are given human qualities. For example, “A very pretty squirrel track;”
    2. Alliteration: The repetition of the same letter sound across the start of several words in a line of text. For example, “Neither can you crack a nut.”

    The Mountain and the Squirrel Summary

    See less
    • 0
  1. “The Mountain and the Squirrel” is a poem in which the Squirrel and the Mountain fight each other to assert their superiority. Both the mountain and the squirrel boast about their superiority and, finally, accept each other’s significant role in God’s creation.   The Mountain and the squirrel SRead more

    “The Mountain and the Squirrel” is a poem in which the Squirrel and the Mountain fight each other to assert their superiority. Both the mountain and the squirrel boast about their superiority and, finally, accept each other’s significant role in God’s creation.

     

    The Mountain and the squirrel Summary

    See less
    • 0
  1. The rhyme scheme is not constant. In the first stanza, the rhyme scheme is aabbccddeeffgg. In the next stanzas from stanzas 2 to five there isn't a rhyme scheme and the poem is blank verse.   Woman Work Summary

    The rhyme scheme is not constant. In the first stanza, the rhyme scheme is aabbccddeeffgg. In the next stanzas from stanzas 2 to five there isn’t a rhyme scheme and the poem is blank verse.

     

    Woman Work Summary

    See less
    • 0