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  1. In Holy Sonnets, Donne expresses profoundly personal thoughts while addressing theological themes of death, divine verdict, divine love and repentance.   Death not be proud Summary

    In Holy Sonnets, Donne expresses profoundly personal thoughts while addressing theological themes of death, divine verdict, divine love and repentance.

     

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    Euphemism- A euphemism is a term that is used to express something else in place of something harsh. Euphemism is used throughout the poem to describe the end of life. Repetition- Repetition is the simple repeating of a word, within a short space of words. Eg, death. Death not be proud Summary

    1. Euphemism- A euphemism is a term that is used to express something else in place of something harsh. Euphemism is used throughout the poem to describe the end of life.
    2. Repetition- Repetition is the simple repeating of a word, within a short space of words. Eg, death.

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  1. The readers are given an ironic sense of comfort by the confident tone of "Death, be not Proud" and straightforward confrontation with death since it implies that death is not in any way anything to be afraid of but that death will ultimately be defeated by something even stronger.   Death notRead more

    The readers are given an ironic sense of comfort by the confident tone of “Death, be not Proud” and straightforward confrontation with death since it implies that death is not in any way anything to be afraid of but that death will ultimately be defeated by something even stronger.

     

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  1. The poem has an ABBA rhyme scheme in the first, second, and third quatrains and an AA rhyme scheme in the couplet.   Death be not proud Summary

    The poem has an ABBA rhyme scheme in the first, second, and third quatrains and an AA rhyme scheme in the couplet.

     

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  1. 1. Personification: It is the process of giving non-human objects human characteristics. Death is personified by Donne throughout the poem, which argues that it shouldn't be arrogant. A characteristic of humans is pride. As a result, death is endowed with the human trait of feeling and emotion. 2. MRead more

    1. Personification: It is the process of giving non-human objects human characteristics. Death is personified by Donne throughout the poem, which argues that it shouldn’t be arrogant. A characteristic of humans is pride. As a result, death is endowed with the human trait of feeling and emotion.
    2. Metaphor: It is a figure of speech in which a word or phrase is applied to an object or action to which it is not literally applicable. Three metaphors can be found in this poem. “Death, be not proud,” which is the first line, uses the first. Death is here compared to a haughty guy. The tenth line, “Thou art slave to fate,” uses the second. In the final line of a lengthy metaphor, death is compared to an improbable or unreal object.
    3. Alliteration: It occurs when the same consonant sounds appear more than once in the same lines of poetry. Examples include the use of the /th/ sound in “And better than thy stroke; why swell’st thou then” and the /m/ sound in “Much pleasure; therefore, from thee much more must flow.”

     

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  1. This poetry ruthlessly dismantles the common perception of death as a strong tyrant. The poet offers an unusual perspective on death. Donne expresses his opinion that Death should not be proud of itself by addressing the poem to it. Even though it has been labeled forceful and frightening, death isRead more

    This poetry ruthlessly dismantles the common perception of death as a strong tyrant. The poet offers an unusual perspective on death. Donne expresses his opinion that Death should not be proud of itself by addressing the poem to it. Even though it has been labeled forceful and frightening, death is neither. It cannot influence the soul, which is eternal.

     

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  1. Because there is a recurrent and uncompromising need to court the woman inside the privacy of a room and consummate sexually, is not found in most important poets before Donne. In the poem, the precinct of the lover's room becomes into a parallel world, a better one, by the fact of its occupancy byRead more

    Because there is a recurrent and uncompromising need to court the woman inside the privacy of a room and consummate sexually, is not found in most important poets before Donne. In the poem, the precinct of the lover’s room becomes into a parallel world, a better one, by the fact of its occupancy by the lovers.

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  1. The poem 'The Good Morrow' by John Donne is a metaphysical love poem in nature. Here he emphasizes the new chapter of their relationship. He uses the metaphor of the seven sleepers who were slept for more than 100 years in a hid out, in which he finds the similarity in their relationship as they werRead more

    The poem ‘The Good Morrow’ by John Donne is a metaphysical love poem in nature. Here he emphasizes the new chapter of their relationship. He uses the metaphor of the seven sleepers who were slept for more than 100 years in a hid out, in which he finds the similarity in their relationship as they were slept for years. As if their feelings have not been appropriate. They indulged themselves in country pleasures. As their love was only physical but not from the inner core of heart .

    But in the second stanza, the poet finds the true awakening. After a long slumber, their souls awakened only to mingle and merge with each other souls originating from the same source displays a maddening thirst of assimilation into each other. They are out of fear. They find a whole world in their own ‘little room’. They find each other as they are the two halfs of their own world of love. Their love in truly transformed from physical to platonic love.

    The title of the poem truly discloses the past and present state of the speaker and his lady love’s spiritual love. Here it plays the appropriate role for justification the metaphysical or Platonic love.

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